The Gamer’s Dilemma

12002144_10153210527829472_2213911743158511248_nColorful boxes filled with chits of cardboard and plastic adorn floor to ceiling shelves. Towards the back of the room a group of three is setting up to play the “new hotness”, the fourth open seat beacons you to join them. You don’t really have extra cash right now to get a new game, but all of these boxes are begging you to take them home, and if you sit down to play you know the result. Each container of gaming goodness provides at least one mechanic, theme or component that you desire. Unable to decide or justify a purchase, you leave the game shop empty handed.
In an effort to take your mind off of all the games you left behind you decide to check in on your family and friends on Facebook. Forgotten until that moment, the Board Game Geek group fills your feed with shelfies, photos of players’ birthday and convention hauls, discussion of the latest games, and requests for recommendations. “You’ve got mail!” Elation builds as you can find solace in your work, but it flitters away as the email loads, “Daily Board Game Sale” is the subject headlining your inbox. Your will breaks, with a few clicks of the mouse and clacks on the keyboard, a new email appears in your inbox… “Order Confirmation”.

Ding! A Kickstarter alert appears.

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Brief Overview – New York 1901

pic2515532_mdNew York 1901 is a drafting area control game by designer Chenier La Salle and Blue Orange Games. The game runs about 45 minutes and plays with 2-4 players. In New York 1901 the goal is to earn the most points by erecting skyscrapers in downtown New York City in… you guessed it, 1901. A mix of tile-laying and card drafting make up the mechanics of the game, while bonus criteria drive the players to focus on certain regions of the board. Cards indicating color and size are laid out in a row and on their turn a player will draft one of those cards. The player then plays one of their four workers to a space on the board matching the chosen card. Finally, the player may build a building on any spaces on the board that they own, including the space that they just obtained. Each player has the same set of bronze, silver, and gold buildings, and there are four “legendary” skyscrapers which are available to all players. Most of the buildings take up more spaces than any given card will provide, so it is important to obtain adjacent spaces to allow you to build bigger and bigger buildings. A player is further restricted by building class. Bronze buildings are the only ones allowed to be built at the beginning of the game. Once a player reaches a certain point threshold they may build silver buildings, and another threshold unlocks the ability to build gold buildings. The player may demolish buildings to build a better one, but may only upgrade from bronze or silver to silver or gold respectively. If a player has only four un-built skyscrapers left or the open market (cards) need to be re-filled but the deck has run out, the end of the game is triggered. In addition to the points earned throughout the game by building, the players then determine the bonus points. At the beginning of the game three street cards and one bonus challenge card are chosen at random. The player who has the most buildings on each of the chosen streets receives a bonus, and in the case of a tie, no points are awarded. Points are also awarded for the bonus challenge which could be anything from who has buildings in the most districts to who has the most gold at the end of the game. The winner is the player with the most points.

Discussion

pic2519680_mdI had the opportunity to play New York 1901 in the Blue Highway Games Board Game Challenge last month and I was very happy that I did. I find that the game ticks off many of my check boxes when it comes to what I like in a game. I like drafting, and I like tile-laying, and I like area control, and New York 1901 is all of these things! The board is colorful and the graphic style of the game is pleasing. Mechanically the game has quite a few rules, but once these are grasped, the game plays fairly easily, and it isn’t all that difficult to grasp the rules. There is a somewhat Tetris-y vibe to the game since the building tiles are all in odd shapes a-la Tetris, and with all of the color flying around you get that feeling of trying to squeeze these buildings into whichever available space you can utilize efficiently. When you couple that with the decision making involved with attempting to meet the various challenges, determining which spaces to take, which spaces to hold in the hopes that nobody else takes the adjacent spaces, all in an effort to get that one bigger building on the board, well then you have a very well-rounded game in my opinion. I had been wanting to play New York 1901 since GenCon last year where it had generated a lot of buzz, but for some reason, I just didn’t make it over to those demo tables. Once the tournament was over they announced that opened copies of the game which they had used for the tournament would be sold at a discount, I jumped at the opportunity to snag a copy. Now I just hope that my family likes the game as much as I do.

Weekly Game Report – 1/25-1/31

I know, I know… I’m late with this week’s update. It turned out that my week was filled up with a lunch interview, and several hours of work for my old company. Last week was still a good week for gaming however. I played games at my regular game night as well as attending the board game challenge at Blue Highway Games!

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Weekly Game Report: 1/4/16-1/10/16

This week I was able to learn and play three new games! (ok, ok, four… but one of those I don’t really count). Sadly we missed game night this week, so the actual play count on the week was a little light. I was able to get in some Friday Night Magic, but that’s a topic for another blog.

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